ATF

Sample Block


Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

1225 Seventeenth Street, Suite 700
Seventeenth Street Plaza
Denver, Colorado 80202

(303) 454-011

Fax: (303) 454-0400

www.justice.gov/usao/co

For Immediate Release

September 21, 2010

David M. Gaouette, United States Attorney

Contact: Jeff Dorschner
(303) 454-0243

Denver Police Department, ATF, and Others Arrest Crip Gang Members and Associates for Drug or Gun Charges

DENVER — Early yesterday morning, officers with the Denver Police Department (DPD) and agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), along with officers from Aurora and Lakewood Police Departments, arrested 11 Crips gang members and associates, including a number of Tre Tre Crips, for federal drug or gun charges, Denver Police Chief Gerald Whitman, ATF Special Agent in Charge Marvin Richardson, and U.S. Attorney John Walsh announced. Those defendants arrested yesterday are to appear in U.S. District Court in Denver at 2:00 p.m. this afternoon, where they will be advised of the charges pending against them and the associated penalties.

Yesterday’s arrests are the third phase of a year and a half long investigation called Operation Cripland. Phase three of the investigation, called Operation Patchwork was conducted by the ATF led Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) Task Force into drug dealing and gun crimes in northeast Denver. Nine defendants were arrested in phase one of the investigation on November 4, 2009. Eleven more were arrested in phase two of the investigation on June 24, 2010. During the course of phase three of the investigation agents and officers seized eight firearms, approximately 22 ounces of crack cocaine, and powder cocaine. In addition, agents and officers yesterday seized one firearm, approximately 12 ounces of crack cocaine, and drug paraphernalia.

Those charged include:

  • David Blea, age 24, of Denver, charged with two counts of knowingly distributing and dispensing 28 grams or more of crack cocaine. Blea faces forfeiture of $3,300 in proceeds from his drug trafficking crimes. If convicted, the defendant faces not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years’ incarceration, and up to a $5,000,000 fine per count.
  • Orlando Jackson, aka Lil Drama, age 20, of Denver, charged with two counts of knowingly distributing and dispensing 50 grams or more of crack cocaine. Jackson faces forfeiture of $3,300 in proceeds from his drug trafficking crimes. If convicted, the defendant faces not less than 10 years, and up to life in federal prison, and up to a $4,000,000 fine per count.
  • Jason Lucero, age 28, of Denver, charged with one count of knowingly distributing and dispensing 5 grams or more of crack cocaine. Lucero faces forfeiture of $850 in proceeds from his drug trafficking crime. If convicted, the defendant faces not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years imprisonment, and up to a $2,000,000 fine.
  • Marlow Martin, aka Lil Ruff, age 23, of Denver, charged with one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm. If convicted, Martin faces not more than 10 years in federal prison, and up to a $250,000 fine.
  • Roger McLamb, aka C Rag, age 31, of Denver, charged with one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm. If convicted, McLamb faces not more than 10 years in federal prison, and up to a $250,000 fine.
  • Brian Mosley, aka Ghost, age 23, of Denver, charged with one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm. If convicted, Mosley faces not more than 10 years in federal prison, and up to a $250,000 fine.
  • Gerald Sandoval, age 34, of Denver, charged with one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm. If convicted, Sandoval faces not more than 10 years in federal prison, and up to a $250,000 fine.
  • William Clark, aka Bird, age 23, of Denver, charged with two counts of knowingly distributing and dispensing 28 grams or more of crack cocaine. Clark faces forfeiture of $2,900 in proceeds from his drug trafficking crime. If convicted, the defendant faces not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years imprisonment, and up to a $5,000,000 fine per count.
  • Kelvin Clark, aka Gizmo and Rodney Louis Marshall, age 24, of Denver, charged with two counts of knowingly distributing and dispensing 28 grams or more of crack cocaine. Clark faces forfeiture of $2,900 in proceeds from his drug trafficking crime. If convicted, the defendant faces not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years imprisonment, and up to a $5,000,000 fine per count.
  • Adrien Ramsey, aka Stroke, age 24, of Denver, charged with one count of knowingly distributing and dispensing 50 grams or more of crack, four counts of being a felon in possession of a firearm, one count of being a felon in possession of ammunition, two counts of knowingly distributing and dispensing less than 28 grams of crack cocaine, one count of knowingly distributing and dispensing 28 grams or more of crack cocaine, and one count of knowingly distributing and dispensing less than 500 grams of powder cocaine. Ramsey faces forfeiture of $4,900 in proceeds from his drug trafficking crime. If convicted of distributing and dispensing 50 grams or more of crack, the defendant faces not less than 10 years, and up to life in prison, and up to a $4,000,000 fine. If convicted of being a felon in possession of a firearm or ammunition, the defendant faces not more than 10 years in federal prison, and up to a $250,000 fine, per count. If convicted of distributing and dispensing less than 28 grams of crack cocaine, the defendant faces not more than 20 years imprisonment, and up to a $1,000,000 fine per count. If convicted of knowingly distributing and dispensing 28 grams or more of crack cocaine or less than 500 grams of powder cocaine, the defendant faces not less than 5 years, and not more than 40 years imprisonment, and up to a $5,000,000 fine.

In addition, Makalani Jackson, aka Macaroni, age 23, Denver, was arrested on state charges perfected during this investigation.

I’m very pleased with the way the operation has gone thus far, said Denver Police Chief Gerald Whitman. This is a clear example of the type of impact we can have on crime in our communities when local and federal law enforcement agencies work together.

The ATF will use all of its resources and investigative tools to disrupt and dismantle gangs, said Special Agent in Charge, Marvin Richardson. We will continue to provide valuable assistance to our law enforcement partners in their pursuit of combating gang violence in our communities.

Yesterday’s arrests show the excellent partnership between the Denver Police Department and the ATF, said U.S. Attorney John Walsh. These two law enforcement agencies have joined forces to take gang crime head on, and to make the streets of Denver safer for everyone.

These cases were investigated by the ATF led PSN Task Force, including the Denver Police Department (DPD), the Aurora Police Department, and the Lakewood Police Department.

The defendants are being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Ryan Bergsieker, with Assistant U.S. Attorney Tonya Andrews assisting with the forfeiture.

The charges in the indictment are allegations, and the defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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