ATF

Sample Block


Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

Eastern District of California

www.justice.gov/usao/cae

For Immediate Release

Friday, July 15, 2011

Benjamin B. Wagner, United States Attorney

Contact: Lauren Horwood, Public Information Officer
(916) 554-2706
usacae.edcapress@usdoj.gov

Fresno and Modesto Men Indicted on Federal Firearms Offenses

FRESNO, Calif. — United States Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner announced that a federal grand jury returned three separate indictments yesterday charging federal firearms offenses.

Sonesay Rathsamy, 29, of Fresno, was charged with being a felon in possession of a Glock .45–caliber pistol. According to the indictment, Rathsamy suffered these previous felony convictions: possession of methamphetamine for sale in 2001, possession of methamphetamine for sale in 2004, and evading a peace officer in 2005.

Mario Guasan–Caserin, 19, of Fresno, was charged with being an illegal alien in possession of a Hi–Point .380–caliber pistol with an obliterated serial number.

Larry Escobedo, 48, of Modesto, was charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm and marijuana cultivation. According to court documents, on June 13, 2011, Escobedo possessed six firearms and had been convicted of felony possession of a controlled substance in 1994 and 2004. The indictment further alleges that Escobedo cultivated 100 or more marijuana plants.

The first two cases are the product of investigations by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Office of Homeland Security (HSI), the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and the Fresno Police Department. The third case is the product of an investigation by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the Modesto Police Department. Assistant United States Attorney Kimberly Sanchez is prosecuting all three cases.

If convicted, Rathsamy faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. Guasan faces up to 15 years in prison and a $500,000 fine. Escobedo faces a maximum statutory penalty of 50 years in prison and $5.25 million in fines. The actual sentences, however, will be determined at the discretion of the court after consideration of any applicable statutory factors and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, which take into account a number of variables.

The charges are only allegations and the defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

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