ATF

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Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

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ATF Explosives Industry Newsletter Masthead
September
2001

Editor,
Gene Baker


operations. The course consists of in-depth discussions and information
exchange regarding the destruction of explosive materials. It
does not cover render safe or disruption techniques covered in
other courses.

The
AEDT course developers are proud to say that AEDT is a course
"for Bomb Techs, by Bomb Techs." Some of the topics
covered in the class include:

EPA
laws and regulations and their impact on destruction operations


Explosive classifications NFPA 921

Incident command

Destruction range operations

Fireworks and pyrotechnic hazards

How to handle a variety of explosive range destruction scenarios


Destruction techniques for most types of explosives, including
ammunition

Students
receive intensive classroom instruction, reinforeeG by two days
on the explosives range practicing the techniques they have learned
in the classroom. Students also take a written pre-test at the
start of the course, as well as a final exam on the last day of
class.

Since
mid-2000, more than 200 State & local bomb technicians have
attended the two-week training sessions. Classes are conducted
in Fredericksburg, Virginia, and nearby Fort A.P. Hill. A total
of 8 classes have been scheduled during FY 200 I, and there are
plans to expand the number of classes to 12 in the next fiscal
year.

For
further information on attending these classes, please contact
the Program Manager, Special Agent Don Robinson, at (202) 927-
3122.

 

SHOCK
TUBE STORAGE REQUIREMENTS

We
frequently get questions regarding the storage requirements for
"shock tube" used in the initiation of non- electric
detonators, or blasting caps. Shock tube or line, which contains
a minute coating of high explosives on the inside lining of the
tube, may not be stored with detonators in the same magazine unless
they are an integral part of an initiation system. Shock tube
classed by the U.S. Department of Transportation as 1.4 explosives
may be kept in a type 4 magazine, constructed in accordance with
the requirements of a low explosives storage magazine found in
Section 55.210 of the Federal Explosives Regulations. Any further
questions on this topic should be addressed to the Public Safety
Branch in ATF Headquarters.

LICENSE
AND PERMIT SIMPLIFICATION

Questions
have been raised regarding the numerous types of explosive licenses
and permits currently available. ATF recognizes that there are
many different types of activity involved in the overall explosives
industry and the need to identify by classification the many different
segments of the industry. This procedure, however, has resulted
in much confusion as to exactly what type of license or permit
is needed for a particular operation. We are in the process of
reviewing the overall scheme of explosives licensing, and we hope
to simplify this procedure in the near future. ATF will reach
out to the explosives industry as we explore various options for
modifying the licensing and permit format.

BOMBING
CASE IN VIRGINIA SOLVED

Joint
Effort by Federal and State Officials Results in Conviction

At
approximately 4:30 a.m. on December 3, 1997, Tammy Lynn Baker
picked up a metal cash box that had been placed at the base of
her apartment steps in the town of Louisa, Virginia. Ms. Baker,
who was

     

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