ATF

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Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

BATS

Your solution for a national, shared database of explosives and arson incidents available on the web around the clock.

Frequently Asked Questions

About

Case Management

Other Systems (Import/Export Tool)

Access Requirements

Support

Training


About


Q: What Is BATS?

BATS is a secure, web-based, computer case management system that is provided to state & local agencies for documenting explosives, fire and arson investigations. BATS was developed primarily with the investigator in mind. BATS is easy-to-use and assists investigators in the gathering, reporting, and accessing of case information for any explosives, fire or arson incident quickly and efficiently. BATS can be used to document any fire, arson, explosion, bombing, or explosives case regardless of cause; including attempts and related threats. Users also have access to critical intelligence advisories and other investigative resources such as online explosives tracing. There is no cost to the participating agency.

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Q: What Is The USBDC?

BATS “links” agencies to the U.S. Bomb Data Center (USBDC) which Congress and the Attorney General have entrusted with maintaining the national repository of arson & explosives incidents. BATS is central to the USBDC’s mission to standardize the reporting of explosives, bombing, and fire incident information from law enforcement and firefighting authorities to facilitate case analysis and comparison in order to provide investigative leads and intelligence.

The USBDC is staffed with a team of special agents (criminal investigators) and intelligence research specialists possessing many years of specialized arson and explosives investigative experience.

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Q: How Easy Is BATS To Use?

BATS was designed for users with minimal computer skills. Using “drop-down” menu options, BATS users can easily document basic incident details in a matter of minutes.

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Q: Isn’t BATS The Same As The National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS)?

The BATS program is separate from the NFIRS database. Whereas the primary mission of NFIRS is to collect fire incident information, BATS is dedicated to documenting the “follow-up” investigation (i.e., case management). According to the U.S. Fire Administration, NFIRS is “not intended to replace” an arson information management system such as BATS.

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Q: What Types Of Incidents Can BATS Be Used For?

BATS can be used to document any explosives, explosion, fire, or arson case. This includes attempts and related threats.

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Q: What Can Fire Investigators Use The “Activity” Section For?

The "activity" section allows fire investigators to track their CFI training, re-certs, courtroom testimony, peer review, and other non-incident responsibilities such as code enforcement.

Note: Use of BATS requires that if an Activity entry is part of an Incident, that related Incident MUST also be entered into BATS. For example: An explosives Disposal (Activity) of Recovered Explosives (Incident) or a Fire Scene Examination (Activity) of a Fire (Incident). The USBDC reserves the right to remove access to BATS due to not reporting Incidents.

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Q: Why Is It Important To Share Information With Other Investigators?

“The 9/11 Commission” declared that “the biggest impediment to … connecting the dots is the human or systemic resistance to sharing information.” This theme is universal to all investigations. A key recommendation was the creation of a “trusted information network” to facilitate better information sharing at the federal, state, and local levels. BATS is the solution to law enforcement and public safety’s long-term inaccessibility to real-time fire and explosives incidents by providing a trusted means to exchange information across the country. Investigations increasingly involve other jurisdictions and transient subjects who move around.

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Q: Has The Issue Of A Single Point Of Reporting For Arson & Explosives Incidents For Law Enforcement And Firefighting Authorities Been Resolved?

Yes. BATS serves as the Nation’s Nation’s repository for information pertaining to bombing, explosives and arson incidents, as mandated by statute and Attorney General directive. In addition, ATF and FBI recently joined in support of efforts by the National Bomb Squad Commanders Advisory Board (NBSCAB) on the issue of explosives incident reporting by bomb technicians. ATF and the FBI jointly endorse and support the use of BATS. Additionally, BATS has been endorsed by the International Association of Bomb Technicians and Investigators (IABTI), the International Association of Arson Investigators (IAAI), NBSCAB, and supported by the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) and the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC).

In August 2010, the Deputy Attorney General's Office directed the FBI and ATF to ensure that all state and local law enforcement that partner with FBI and ATF in explosives investigations, report in BATS, in order to be a "comprehensive" database. BATS is also part of the national curriculum at the Hazardous Devices School (bomb technicians) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama and the National Fire Academy's Fire/Arson Origin-and-Cause Investigations course in Emmitsburg, MD. In addition, BATS is part of the FBI's Model for Bomb Squad Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs).

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Q: What Is The Federal Participation In BATS?

Federal law (18 USC 846b) requires all Federal agencies to report incidents involving arson and the suspected criminal misuse of explosives to the USBDC. In 2004, the Attorney General directed the consolidation of all Department of Justice (DOJ) arson and explosives incident databases into a single system, which is now known as BATS. As a result, the ATF Arson and Explosives Incident System (AEXIS) and the former FBI Automated Incident Reporting System (AIRS) have been consolidated into BATS. In August 2010, the Deputy Attorney General’s Office directed the FBI and ATF to ensure that all state and local law enforcement that partner with FBI and ATF in explosives investigations, report in BATS, in order to be a "comprehensive" database. BATS is also part of the national curriculum at the Hazardous Devices School (bomb technicians) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama and the National Fire Academy’s Fire/Arson Origin-and-Cause Investigations course in Emmitsburg, MD. In addition, BATS is part of the FBI’s Model for Bomb Squad Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs).

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Q: What About Render Safe Procedures (RSP) Reporting?

BATS has a bomb technician-only RSP section to document and store information pertaining to Render Safe Procedures.

This section along with the bomb techs only advisory section is only accessible to agencies that have a valid bomb squad identification number, and to users that have a bomb squad expiration date that is not expired.

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Q: What Are The Benefits Of Participating In BATS?

BATS provides your unit with state-of-the-art technology to manage and keep track of all your investigations and administrative activities. Users can easily create professional reports using standardized terminology for consistency. This provides the investigator with the ability to efficiently communicate investigative findings with a prosecutor and other investigators.

The value of the information in BATS is dependent on the quality of incident reporting. This data is not only important to the successful conclusion of the case being investigated but can also help “connect the dots” to other cases across jurisdictions.

The USBDC also provides Congress with statistical reporting regarding explosives, bombing, and fire incidents. Full participation in BATS enables your agency to be accurately represented and can better make a case to acquire needed resources (e.g., grant writing, statistics, mapping, identifying a community’s arson problem, juvenile fire setter programs, budget accounting/requests, planning, equipment requests, meetings with municipal leaders, etc).

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Q: What is the Level of Security for Handling BATS Information?

BATS contains Sensitive But Unclassified (SBU) information from law enforcement and public safety agencies in the Information Sharing Environment (ISE). BATS is certified as secure under the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) and is Section 508, 1194.21 compliant (Software Applications and Operating Systems).

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Q: Is It Possible To Report Incidents To The USBDC Without Spending A Lot Of Time In BATS?

The latest version of BATS includes icon-driven wizards and decision trees to quickly create an incident in a matter of minutes with the option to enter additional information in the future.

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Q: My Department Has Multiple Units With Bomb/Arson Responsibilities. Can An Agency Have Multiple BATS Accounts?

Yes. Agencies can have separate accounts based on each ORI. The ORI serves as an Agency/Unit Identifier. Each account header/seal can be designed to reflect the specific unit.

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Q: Can My Department Enter Past Incidents Into BATS?

Yes, there are no date restrictions for your agency entering past incidents into BATS. This may also serve as a training opportunity to become more familiar with the system. The USBDC will not enter past incidents for you.


Q: What Happens After Completing the Online Application Request Form?

After completing the online application, the system will auto-reply to your designated e-mail address with the necessary forms for completing the application process. Please reference the e-mail response to your initial BATS application for downloading the necessary forms. If you did not receive an e-mail reply, please check your spam or junk e-mail folders. If you have deleted the e-mail, please restart the application process online @ www.BATS.gov. It is also recommended that you add USBDC@atf.gov on your safe senders list in order to prevent messages from being marked as spam

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Q: How are FOIA requests handled for BATS?

ATF and the USBDC do not process public records requests for records contributed to BATS by non-ATF agencies. The requestor should direct their inquiry to the agency they believe has record(s) relevant to their request. Disclosures made under a non-federal agency’s State Public and Open Records Laws (including arson immunity laws) or other internal agency dissemination policies applies only to incident reports that the participating agency has contributed into BATS. State public and open records laws apply do not create a right of access to records held by Federal agencies.

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Q: What is the Policy Regarding the Disclosure/Dissemination of BATS information?

BATS contains information from the investigation of possible crimes involving explosives and fire as reported by local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement and public safety agencies throughout the United States. This information is reported to BATS as a result of a variety of investigative actions including but not limited to incident responses, crime scene processing, and interviews of suspects and potential witnesses. The agency contributing information into BATS is the custodian/owner of that record and responsible for maintaining the original. This information is designated as case data collected by law enforcement in the performance of their duties and is exempt from the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. § 552a(j)(2)). See also FOIA’s law enforcement exemptions, 5 U.S.C. 552(b)(7) which generally exempts from disclosure records or information compiled for law enforcement purposes.

Disclosures made under a non-federal agency’s State Public and Open Records Laws (including arson immunity laws) or other internal agency dissemination policy applies only to incident reports that the participating agency has contributed into BATS.

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Q: Where Can I Find the Privacy Impact Assessment for BATS?

Click here to access the report.


Q: How can Fusion Centers utilize BATS?

As part of the USBDC's commitment to supporting fusion centers, new user roles have been created for fusion center analysts. This will allow fusion centers to have direct access to BATS with the added capability to interface with their local bomb squad and fire investigation communities. For example, a bomb technician or fire investigator can enter details in BATS on an IED or arson incident and then grant "case access" to their local fusion center. This allows the fusion center analyst to provided assistance by searching BATS for similarities in IED components, suspects, motives, and crime methodologies nationwide. Analysts can also "attach" files such as work product, photos, videos, documents, and other analysis to a particular incident. In addition, BATS users can access explosives & arson advisories as well as other research & explosives expertise by ATF & USBDC.


Case Management


Q: How Can I Use BATS To Document My Investigation?

BATS allows investigators to easily create professional reports using standardized terminology for consistency. Users are able to capture details of explosives and fire cases, including improvised explosive device (IED) components, incendiary devices, origin-and-cause or device placement, suspect information, casualties, dollar losses, fire descriptors, collateral crimes, witness interviews, juvenile firesetters, and descriptions of how a device was delivered. BATS also allows investigators to upload photo images, x-rays, audio/video files, scanned witness statements, lab reports, canine reports, and write narratives detailing investigative activity for any fire or explosives incident. Investigative reports are printed using each department's header and logo. Investigators can use GIS (data mapping) features to provide "visual" analysis and assist in uncovering patterns and trends. BATS also allows agencies to generate statistical reports for incidents within their jurisdiction

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Q: What Does A BATS Report Look Like?

Since each agency administers their BATS account, reports are branded with your department’s header and logo. (Click here to view a sample BATS report.)

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Q: What Are The Benefits Of Using A Case Management System?

BATS helps investigators easily manage and track their investigations. As there are multiple facets and each case is different, BATS aids investigators in organizing the case by easily documenting facts and evidence. It also helps investigators with planning their investigation.

BATS provides an agency with an easy means of retrieving information on old cases. Investigators are able to cross-reference their case details for possible “links” to other investigations. BATS gives investigators access to various pre-formatted reports contained within the BATS application. These reports provide investigators with a detailed representation of their incident data. Since the information has already been entered once, an investigator does not have to re-enter case details to generate different reports.

Today’s legal climate for arson and fire investigations has required that fire investigators use proven scientific methodologies for their expert testimony to be admissible in court. A quality fire investigation report is essential to a successful arson prosecution. BATS provides users with a firm foundation for documenting “origin & cause” and other investigative activity.

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Q: How does BATS assist supervisors with reviewing unit reports?

BATS now includes a "incident review tool" feature, allowing supervisors to review and approve BATS reports. This feature allows supervisors to review the BATS entry, and send messages to members of their unit regarding the incident entry prior to the incident being uploaded to the database. As the default setting, the supervisor or other person designated by your agency as the BATS account manager, has been assigned this compliance verification ability. If your agency wishes to assign the incident review duty to another member of the unit, please contact the USBDC. Many agencies use the incident review tool as part of the overall "peer review" process for expert testimony. For additional information on "peer review" and the "scientific method" please click here

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Q: Will My Case Information Be Shared with Other Agencies?

BATS has multiple security measures built in order to prevent outside, unauthorized access to the data contained therein. In addition, each agency controls the level of access to their BATS incident information by other local, state, and federal agencies in order to protect the sensitivity of their investigations while conforming to their internal policies for information dissemination. Investigators have the option to specify on a case-by-case basis one of three options in order to protect their data inputs. Items entered can be designated as either Unrestricted (which allows any BATS user access to all but juvenile-related data), Restricted (provides only contact information for the case investigator in order to request access to the information), or Notify Me If Viewed. The case is designated as unrestricted but the original contributor will be notified when there is an attempt to view the data. In addition, a user can select which agency (or specific investigator) to share with, thus allowing them to work collaboratively. The USBDC encourages users to unrestrict access to closed and other inactive cases in order to facilitate sharing within the BATS user community. Note: Regardless of the sharing level, non-law enforcement agencies (e.g., public safety agencies without an ORI) cannot query law enforcement cases.

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Q: What If A User Leaves The Department (e.g., Retirements, Reassignment)?

The case management features of BATS allow a department to easily reassign an investigation to a new investigator. Agency BATS account managers must contact the USBDC to have user’s account deactivated.

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Q: Can a Department Have More Than One Account Manager?

Yes, the USBDC recommends having at least two (2).

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Q: What is the difference between an “Incident” and an “Activity?”

“Incidents” are for documenting suspicious packages, fires, bombings, explosives-related recoveries, explosions, hoax devices, and bomb threats.

The “Activity” section is for documenting non-incidents such as training, destructs, operational stand-by, magazine inventories/inspections, equipment maintenance, courtroom testimony, re-certs, briefings, peer review, etc. The “activity” section is not for documenting “incidents.”

Reporting “incidents” in BATS ensures that your squad is accurately represented in the national database as well as Congressional and other reporting. This is not only important to the successful conclusion of an investigation but can also “connect the dots” to other cases or identity a particular type of device that may be associated with a known bomb maker (i.e., signature). When Incident information is entered into the Activities section, this information is not available to your fellow bomb technicians and investigators when they conduct their queries of the system.

The latest version of BATS features significant “user-driven” improvements adding to the system’s overall user-friendliness. In addition to the Advisories and the Investigative Resource Library, you have access to details on hundreds of thousands of incident records. As always, your agency is in control of the level of access that other agencies have to your own incident records.

Note: Use of BATS requires that if an Activity entry is part of an Incident, that related Incident MUST also be entered into BATS. For example: An explosives Disposal (Activity) of Recovered Explosives (Incident) or a Fire Scene Examination (Activity) of a Fire (Incident). The USBDC reserves the right to remove access to BATS due to not reporting Incidents.

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Q: How are BATS entries handled if more than one agency responds to the incident?

Each agency is responsible for administering their BATS account. When two or more agencies report the same incident in BATS, the system will perform a de-confliction check based on the date, time, and location of the incident. If the system determines the incident has already been reported by another agency, the BATS user may request access to the original agency's BATS incident and contribute to it or create their own incident record.

In either event, each agency will receive credit for the incident and be able to claim it as a measurement of workload for administrative and operational purposes. Pointer (or contact) information will be displayed for all involved agencies in the event another agency receives a hit based on similar incident details. However, for the actual national and state BATS incident counts, duplicate incidents will only be counted once.

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Q: How do BATS participants set up the On-Demand “E-Notification” utility for their squad/office BATS entries?

BATS account managers and supervisors may now contact the USBDC to coordinate the automated delivery of BATS-entry reports. These reports can be set up in any manner, but as an example: an account manager can arrange with the USBDC to have a daily automated report, delivered by email each day, listing every BATS incident entered by the squad/unit/task force or custom group within the past 24 hours. This can be set up for Incidents or Activities, or both, and can be delivered on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. These automated reports make for an ideal management tool, saving supervisors from having to sign into BATS to run an administrative report for the same information. They can also be used to maintain and promote situational awareness of reported incidents in your area of responsibility.

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Other Systems (Import/Export Tool)


Q: My Agency Uses An Existing Record Management System (RMS). Can I Still Participate?

Each agency is responsible for administering their BATS account. This includes customizing their report headers and determining whether to share information with other agencies. The latest version of BATS allows each Agency Administrator to import information from an agency’s internal system into BATS. However, the data from the external source system MUST be converted by the contributing agency into the required BATS schema format in order for this process to work correctly. Data from a source system can be imported on a one-time basis and then the record must be maintained through BATS. Therefore, agencies are encouraged to use the import tool to upload historical incident information into BATS. The schema is available to agency account managers within BATS. New incidents can then be entered directly into an agency’s BATS account allowing participants to take advance of the state-of-the-art case management and connecting the dots features of BATS. There is no charge to local / state / federal agencies.

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Q: I am a Records Management System (RMS) vendor and would like to link to BATS.

The administrative features of BATS consists of the ability to manually export an agency’s data out of BATS as well as import data from another system into BATS provided the data is in the required XML schema. BATS does not, at this time, provide an interconnection capability with external systems. RMS vendors who are interested in funding a real-time interconnection to BATS should send a formal request (outlying the high level design approach) to the Director of the USBDC. Any proposal must satisfy information technology, security, privacy and other requirements as set forth by ATF and the USBDC.

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Q: What is the difference between BATS and TRIPwire, LEO, or N-DEx?.

BATS is an incident-based reporting system that serves as the nation's repository for explosives & arson related incidents as authorized by the Federal Explosives Laws and the Attorney General. It was developed to facilitate and promote the collection, sharing and diffusion of intelligence information concerning crimes involving explosives and fires. While ATF and the USBDC maintain the web-based BATS system, each agency is responsible for administering their account. BATS provides bomb squads and fire investigation units with technology to manage and track their day-to-day incident responses and related activities. Incident details are directly entered by local, state & federal bomb technicians, bomb investigators, and fire investigators using a standardized lexicon unique to IEDs and fire investigations. This information can be searched in real-time and is essential to the identification of a particular style of an IED that may be associated with a known bomb maker (i.e., signature) or in identifying a particular M.O (e.g., serial-type cases).

BATS includes a case management functionality that allows users to build their investigation while maintaining operational security. BATS users can also collaborate with other agencies to include fusion centers in a virtual "task force" setting, which is ideal for multi-jurisdictional investigations or special events. Case data in BATS is designated as law enforcement sensitive and restricted from the public. Direct entry by law enforcement and public safety users enhances the quantity, accuracy, and timeliness of the information leading to a more meaningful analysis as opposed to summary data. The structured data fields in BATS ensure the use of standardized language and also simplifies the process of data mining for analysis, statistics, and management reports as opposed to data in "narrative" format which cannot be reused for other computational purposes.

TRIPwire (Technical Resource for Incident Prevention) is an Internet-based information-sharing network administered by the DHS. It is not for reporting incident details involving explosives and/or fire but provides information on international terrorist bombings, relevant news, and threat alerts to assist homeland security professionals with bombing awareness and prevention. Information is gathered from open-source publications, as well as government issued threat bulletins and advisories. BATS users can link to TRIPwire as well as other useful websites such as LEO by clicking the "Useful Links" tab within BATS.

LEO (Law Enforcement Online) is an Internet-based communications portal administered by the FBI. It is not a records management system (RMS) and includes a national alert system, special interest groups, access to databases like those run by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, e-mail services, a virtual command center, distance learning, and a multimedia library of publications, documents, studies, research, technical bulletins, and other reports. BATS users can link to LEO as well as other useful websites such as TRIPwire and more by clicking the "Useful Links" tab within BATS.

N-DEx (National Data Exchange) allows participating law enforcement agencies to submit their incident data to a central repository maintained by the FBI where they are compared against incidents that other agencies have uploaded. N-DEx is not a records management system (RMS) or statistical reporting system. It can be accessed through LEO and the information is as current as the data submitted and /or updated by participating agencies. (See also section on "exporting BATS data")

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Access Requirements


Q: How Do I Access BATS?

Authorized Users receive a User ID and Password from the USBDC for secured access using any work computer (police or fire) and the Internet. The web address is www.BATS.gov.

Note: All wireless use of BATS must be in accordance with the user’s agreement.

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Q: Why Is National Crime Information Center (NCIC) A Requirement For “Full Access” BATS Participation?

BATS contains information from the investigation of possible crimes involving explosives and fire as reported by local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement and public safety agencies throughout the United States. This information is reported to BATS as a result of a variety of investigative actions including but not limited to incident responses, crime scene processing, and interviews of suspects and potential witnesses. This information is designated as case data collected by law enforcement in the performance of their duties and is exempt from the Privacy Act. In addition, each agency administers their own BATS account and controls the level of access to their information.

In order to safeguard and maintain the integrity of the law enforcement sensitive (LES) information contained in the national database (BATS), ATF and the USBDC use the NCIC ORI number to verify an agency's law enforcement/criminal justice status and maintain operational security of the system.

NCIC (or the National Crime Information Center) is the national standard for sharing criminal history information such as criminal records, fugitives, stolen properties, and missing persons. It is maintained by the FBI's Criminal Justice Information Services Division (CJIS). An ORI (or Originating Agency Identifier) is a 9-character alphanumeric identifier assigned by CJIS to agencies that meet the specific requirements set forth by the FBI. An agency may be assigned an ORI regardless of whether the agency has an NCIC computer terminal. If your agency does not have an ORI click here.

Note: BATS is web-based. A CJIS terminal is not required for BATS usage.

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Q: Is A CJIS-Terminal Part Of BATS?

No. BATS is web-based and only requires a work computer (police or fire) with Internet access. An Originating Requesting Agency Identifier (ORI) number serves as an agency’s unique identifier. There is no interface with NCIC.

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Q: Are There Any Direct Costs Or Software Required To Participate In BATS?

No. BATS is web-based and does not require any special software. The USBDC is responsible for maintaining the system, to include upgrades.

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Q: I Am A Fire Department Investigator And My Agency Does NOT Have An ORI, Can I Still Participate In BATS?

Yes, non-law enforcement fire departments that participate in a joint police/fire arson task force have the option of partnering with a law enforcement (LE) agency for full access to BATS. Such accounts must have a sponsoring police department. Non-LE public safety agencies also have the option of contacting their state Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) point of contact (POC) to apply for an ORI. By obtaining an ORI from CJIS, an agency will maintain their own account and gain full access to the national database. Access to NCIC is not a requirement for applying for the ORI. The USBDC can provide information on applying for an ORI number from your state CJIS POC. (see next section for fire-department only accounts).

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Q: Can A Fire Department’s Fire Investigation Unit (FIU) Have Their Own BATS Account (Non Joint Police / Fire)?

Yes. As part of our commitment to supporting firefighting authorities, the USBDC is able to establish new user roles in BATS, including one for non-law enforcement (non-LE) public safety fire investigators.

Non-LE BATS users will have limited access to BATS to document incidents and activities, and have query abilities for all of their own data, as well as other non-LE user incident data. The non-LE users will also have access to the non-LE sensitive posted advisories and investigative resources. This will allow agencies to use BATS for case management, data collection and analysis, incident reporting, and activity tracking. The non-LE users will also have access to the non-LE sensitive posted advisories and investigative resources.

Non-LE public safety agencies still have the option of partnering with a law enforcement agency for full access to BATS. Non-LE public safety agencies also have the option of contacting their state Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) point of contact (POC) to apply for an ORI. By obtaining an ORI from CJIS, an agency will maintain their own account and gain full access to the national database. The USBDC can provide, upon request, information on applying for an ORI number from your state CJIS POC. Please note that ATF and the USBDC are not involved in the ORI application. For additional information click here.


Q: If my agency applies for an ORI and access to NCIC, without being an NCIC terminal entity, are we then able to have full access to BATS?

Requests for an ORI number must be sent to your state’s respective CJIS Systems Officer (CSO), along with supporting documentation to include the department’s statutory authority, the budget of the subunit (e.g., fire investigation unit, arson squad, bomb squad, etc.), the duties and functions of the subunit, as well as any training and certifications relative to the mission of the subunit.

Upon approval by the CSO, the request will be forwarded to the FBI, Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division to determine if the agency meets the criteria for ORI assignment as contained in the DOJ Regulations on Criminal Justice Information Systems (Title 28, Code of Federal Regulations [CFR], Part 20, Subpart A).

Please note that ATF and the USBDC are not involved in the ORI application process.

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Q: How Can A Military EOD Unit Participate In BATS?

As part of the U.S. Bomb Data Center’s commitment to supporting military Explosives Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Units, BATS is available for limited-access to Explosives-related advisories, optional incident reporting, as well as use of the activity section.


Support


Q: Who Do I Contact If I Get Locked Out Of My Account?

BATS has a 24-hour Help Desk at (877) 875-3723 to assist state/local users with password issues.

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Q: Who Do I Contact For Suggestions On Improving The BATS Program?

The USBDC is committed to making BATS more user-friendly and encourages feedback from users. Users should send an e-mail to the USBDC at: USBDC@ATF.gov.

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Q: Who Do I Contact For Additional Information On BATS?

To obtain additional information, please contact the U.S. Bomb Data Center via any one of three ways: calling 1-800-461-8841, sending an e-mail to USBDC@ATF.gov, or completing the BATS Access Request Form.

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Q: Who do I Contact for Assistance with Error Messages

If you are experience technical problems, please e-mail USBDC@atf.gov and include a screenshot of the issue (see below instructions).

How to Take a Screenshot and Email It (HTML format messages such as MS Outlook):

      Press the Print Screen button (upper right area of your keyboard) to capture the whole screen.
      Open your e-mail program
      Create a new message.
      In the "message" section, right-click and select paste (or from the menu, select edit > paste)

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    Training


    Q: Where do I find material to assist with the use of BATS?

    Upon logging in to BATS, users can view any of the "how to" videos contained in the video library on the main menu. These videos cover entering explosives-related incidents, fire/arson incidents, as well as "account manager" functions (e.g., uploading report seals, reviewing reports, general unit maintenance features, etc). Users may also contact the USBDC by calling 1-800-461-8841 or sending an e-mail to USBDC@atf.gov.

    BATS is also part of the national curriculum at the Hazardous Devices School (bomb technicians) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama and the National Fire Academy's Fire/Arson Origin-and-Cause Investigations course in Emmitsburg, MD.

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    Q: How does my department host regional hands-on “live” BATS training?

    As part of our commitment to supporting bomb squads & fire investigation units, the U.S. Bomb Data Center (USBDC) has provided training & direction to ATF special agents on protocols for coordinating BATS training for their state & local partners. The main requirement is obtaining use of a computer lab with computers for each attendee (e.g., police academy, fire academy, community college, etc).

    Each session covers real-world scenarios (e.g., bombings, juvenile fire setters, explosive recoveries, car fires, training/administrative activities, etc) and typically last approximately 2 ½ to 3 hours. The USBDC recommends a minimum of 15 attendees for each session. Please submit your BATS training request to your local ATF office.

    Interested agencies may also contact other local, state, or federal BATS users and request that they put on a hands-on training course for them.

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